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Category Archives: book awards

Suspicion by Joseph Finder

Suspicion by Joseph Finder

http://www.josephfinder.com

Review repost

I had the pleasure of reviewing this books several months ago. I am reposting the review today because Suspicion has been nominated for the 2015 Barry Award for BEST Thriller. And Suspicion has been nominated for the coveted 2015 Thriller Award for BEST Hardcover Novel. CONGRATULATIONS!
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Beautiful Memoir

Beautiful Memoir

  • ISBN-13: 9780525427209
  • ISBN-10: 0525427201
  • Publisher: Viking
  • Publish Date: March 2015
  • Page Count: 288

Books-A-Million PRESIDENT’S PICK
“I read George Hodgman’s extraordinary memoir in one seamless glorious sitting. You will want to take your time and savor your experience with this amazing family, this moving story and its timeless lessons. Bettyville is full of love, and grace, and tenderness. Unforgettable and engaging in its humor and in its heart.” –    Terrance G. Finley, President and Chief Executive Officer

Beautifully written memoir that touches the heart, tickles the funny bone and causes you to pause and reflect. George Hodgman, an unemployed, recovering addict, leaves his fast paced Manhattan world behind, returning to his childhood home in Paris, Missouri, to care for his elderly mother, Betty. The role reversal alone is very difficult, parent becoming the child and child talking on the role of parent – but there are other factors that make this situation even more trying… George can’t select an outfit or prepare a meal without enduring his mother’s criticisms. At times he’s able to hold his temper in check, while at others, the two really butt heads. But the real elephant in the room is George’s homosexuality. Although he’s been “out” with his parents for years, it’s a silent subject (one everyone is aware of, but doesn’t discuss).

George’s story is much more than that of a son returning home to care for his mother…it’s a personal journey of acceptance. He finds peace within himself and with his mother. As the novel progresses you feel a personal connection with these people – which, for me, is the defining aspect of a good book. And while there are no “ah-ha moments”, nor gold at the end of the rainbow, there’s a feeling of satisfaction that all is as it was intended.

This is a good book that I really enjoyed reading. Having taken care of my grandmother the last several years of her life, so much of George’s story was my story. The surface issues were different…but at the core it was the same. I would recommend this book to anyone that enjoys a good book.

 

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Banned & Challenged Books

 

BBW_30-Years_200x200

Here’s a list of banned and challenged books.

ALA-freadom-slide-780

The week may have passed, but you can still get involved…by simply reading one of these books. (or two, or three….)
Exercise your right to read the literature of your choice. You have the right to make the decision of what is acceptable and what
is too controversial for you…personally. These are personal, individual decisions… and each of us has the right to make the choice
for ourselves. Based on our individually held beliefs.

 

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National Book Award Finalists

It’s that time of year again- Here are the 2012 Finalists…

 

square it

The judges have their work cut out for them … as has always been the case, the books that  have made it to this stage are the cream of the crop – take a look at the finalists….

             Do you have a favorite?

post a comment with your favorite or send us an email

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FICTION

Fiction Finalists

FINALISTS:

Junot Díaz, This Is How You Lose Her (Riverhead Books, a member of Penguin Group USA, Inc.)

Dave Eggers, A Hologram for the King (McSweeney’s Books)

Louise Erdrich, The Round House (Harper, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)

Ben Fountain, Billy Lynn’s Long Halftime Walk (Ecco, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)

Kevin Powers, The Yellow Birds (Little, Brown and Company)

POETRY

2012 NBA Poetry Finalists

FINALISTS:

David Ferry, Bewilderment: New Poems and Translations (University of Chicago Press)

Cynthia Huntington, Heavenly Bodies (Southern Illinois University Press)

Tim Seibles, Fast Animal (Etruscan Press)

Alan Shapiro, Night of the Republic (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

Susan Wheeler, Meme (University of Iowa Press)

NONFICTION

2012 NBA Nonfiction Finalists

FINALISTS:

Anne Applebaum, Iron Curtain: The Crushing of Eastern Europe, 1945-1956 (Doubleday)

Katherine Boo, Behind the Beautiful Forevers: Life, Death, and Hope in a Mumbai Undercity (Random House)

Robert A. Caro, The Passage of Power: The Years of Lyndon Johnson, Volume 4 (Knopf)

Domingo Martinez, The Boy Kings of Texas (Lyons Press, an imprint of Globe Pequot Press)

Anthony Shadid, House of Stone: A Memoir of Home, Family, and a Lost Middle East (Houghton Mifflin Harcourt)

YOUNG PEOPLE’S LITERATURE

2012 NBA YPL  Finalists

FINALISTS:

William Alexander, Goblin Secrets (Margaret K. McElderry Books, an imprint of
Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)

Carrie Arcos, Out of Reach (Simon Pulse, an imprint of Simon & Schuster Children’s Publishing)

Patricia McCormick, Never Fall Down (Balzer+Bray, an imprint of HarperCollinsPublishers)

Eliot Schrefer, Endangered (Scholastic)

Steve Sheinkin, Bomb: The Race to Build—and Steal—the World’s Most Dangerous Weapon
(Flash Point, an imprint of Roaring Brook Press)

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Posted by on October 19, 2012 in ♥BOOKs♥, book awards

 

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2010 Edgar Nominees

AND THE NOMINEES ARE……….

2010

Best Novel:
· The Missing by Tim Gautreaux
· The Odds by Kathleen George
· The Last Child by John Hart
· The Mystic Arts of Erasing All Signs of Death by Charlie Huston
· Nemesis by Jo Nesbø, translated by Don Bartlett
· A Beautiful Place to Die by Malla Nunn

Best First Novel by an American Author:
· The Girl She Used to Be by David Cristofano
· Starvation Lake by Bryan Gruley
· The Weight of Silence by Heather Gudenkauf
· A Bad Day for Sorry by Sophie Littlefield
· Black Water Rising by Attica Locke
· In the Shadow of Gotham by Stefanie Pintoff

Best Paperback Original:
· Bury Me Deep by Megan Abbott
· Havana Lunar by Robert Arellano
· The Lord God Bird by Russell Hill
· Body Blows by Marc Strange
· The Herring-Seller’s Apprentice by L.C. Tyler

Best Fact Crime:
· Columbine by Dave Cullen
· Go Down Together: The True, Untold Story of Bonnie and Clyde by Jeff Guinn
· The Fence: A Police Cover-Up Along Boston’s Racial Divide by Dick Lehr
· Provenance: How a Con Man and a Forger Rewrote the History of Modern Art by Laney Salisbury and Aly Sujo
· Vanished Smile: The Mysterious Theft of Mona Lisa by R.A. Scotti

Best Critical/Biographical Work:
· Talking About Detective Fiction by P.D. James
· The Lineup: The World’s Greatest Crime Writers Tell the Inside Story of Their Greatest Detectives edited by Otto Penzler
· Haunted Heart: The Life and Times of Stephen King by Lisa Rogak
· The Talented Miss Highsmith: The Secret Life and Serious Art of Patricia Highsmith by Joan Schenkar
· The Stephen King Illustrated Companion by Bev Vincent

Best Young Adult:
· Reality Check by Peter Abrahams
· If the Witness Lied by Caroline B. Cooney
· The Morgue and Me by John C. Ford
· Petronella Saves Nearly Everyone by Dene Low
· Shadowed Summer by Saundra Mitchell

Best Juvenile:
· The Case of the Case of Mistaken Identity by Mac Barnett
· The Red Blazer Girls: The Ring of Rocamadour by Michael D. Beil
· Creepy Crawly Crime by Aaron Reynolds
· Closed for the Season by Mary Downing Hahn
· The Case of the Cryptic Crinoline by Nancy Springer

Grand Master Award:
· Dorothy Gilman

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Posted by on February 2, 2010 in 3R♥s, book awards, News, novel, NY Times

 

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Wordsworth Dances the Waltz by Frances H. Kakugawa

Wordsworth Dances the Waltz by Frances Kakugawa

Wordsworth Dances the Waltz
Frances H. Kakugawa

ISBN 10: 0979064732
ISBN 13: 978-0979064739

Children 9+

Hardcover, 32pages

Watermark Publishing

Wordsworth Dances The Waltz features a family of mice, living much as any family – enjoying their day to day lives, when time creeps up on a them…

Wordsworth first love is poetry – for a long while now it has been his source of comfort and understanding…writing is this little mouse’s way of dealing with life. And so when his beloved Grandma comes to stay with the family Wordsworth is shocked and a bit frightened by the changes that have taken place. The once vibrant, boisterous home, filled with the sounds of music and laughter has fallen quiet and his parents talk in hushed voices…whispering about how Grandma is losing her memory and things just aren’t the same. 

Wordsworth is saddened and very disappointed when his father tells him Grandma can’t attend the special Grandparent’s program at school. Before class that morning Wordsworth sits beside his Grandma’s bed and writes a poem, expressing his feelings – ending with – “She’s still my Grandma, isn’t she?”

What follows is a touching reunion of family, with a new found understanding of how they will interact from this day forward. This is a beautifully written, heartfelt story that addresses dementia, Alzheimer’s and loss of independence, subjects families are dealing with everyday. Seniors are an integral part of the family tree and it’s important to maintain close bonds and continue to interact with and allow children to enjoy the time they have with them…it is precious! 

I highly recommend this story to all families – there should be a copy in every elementary school, library and nursing home. Especially senior care facilities – this book would be an excellent tool to ease youngsters fears, answer questions they may not be able to express and reassure them Grandma or Grandpa may be different, but they love you and they’re still an important part of the family!
If you or someone you know is facing any of these situations, pick up a copy of this book!

Happy Reading!BIGsmily
RJ McGill
3Rs Den

WriterTweeter 

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A Carrion Death by Michael Stanley

a-carrion-death-by-michael-stanley
A Carrion Death

Michael Stanley
ISBN: 0061252409
ASIN: B0010W500K
Fiction, 480 pages
Harper Collins
www.harpercollins.com

www.detectivekubu.com


Michael Sears and Stanley Trollip, writing as Michael Stanley have penned an impressive debut novel, recognized as a Debut Dagger and 2008 Minnesota Book Award Finalist. These two African adventurers have enjoyed numerous safaris and are well versed in the ways of the bush. Extensive experience and distinctive writing flair combine to make A Carrion Death a good read!


Stanley introduces readers to the main character, the Assistant Superintendent of Botswana’s Police Department, David Bengu, aka “Kubu.” An appropriate nickname, considering his size and insatiable appetite, as Kubu is Setswana for hippopotamus. A strong, tenacious man, that loves his wife Joy and cares for his aging parents. He doesn’t mind going against the tide and still believes in the old-fashioned values of honor, respect and justice. It is these qualities that will endear Kubu to readers, because he’s a believable, three dimensional character, with strengths and weaknesses we can all relate too.

Detective Kubu is called out to the desert, where a group of scientists on a field trip , discovered a badly decomposed, dismembered body that has also been ravaged by wild animals. Kubu instinctively recognizes he’s dealing with a murder, which is later confirmed by the medical examiner. Investigating this death is compounded by decomposition and what appears to be specific mutilation, meant to hinder any attempts at identification. The search for information on this John Doe leads the detective to Botswana Cattle and Mining Company (BCMC), headed by Cecil Hofmeyr, who just happens to be a golfing buddy of Jacob Makabu…who just happens to be Kubu’s boss! And the plot thickens…

The tense dynamic within the Hofmeyr family is in stark opposition to the loving, warm relationships within the Bengu family. It’s soon revealed that Cecil Hofmeyr’s days running BCMC solo are numbered, as his niece and nephew, Dianna and Angus, will inherit their father’s share of the company on their 30th birthdays and he is concerned his many questionable deals will soon be uncovered. As the investigation continues, Kubu is reunited with old friends, begins to question the motives of some of those close to him and watches, seemingly helpless, as one after another of his contacts is found murdered.


A Carrion Death crisscrosses two genres, thriller and mystery, which at times seems to cause the story to run long and be unnecessarily complex, which is not unusual for a first installment. However, where this series differs is with the strength of their main character, as well as, the incredibly detailed and authentic African scenery, which set this debut apart, leading me to expect great things from Detective Kubu in the future.

Happy Reading!   😉
~ RJ
3Rs Reading Den
©


FYI:
From Wikipedia
*Carrion (from the Latin caro, meaning meat) refers to the carcass of a dead animal. Carrion is an important food source for large carnivores and omnivores in most ecosystems and plays an important role in the circle of life. (Ex. Hyenas, Vultures, Black Bears, Bald Eagles, Raccoons, etc.)

An example of carrion in literature can be found in Julius Caesar, Act 3 scene 1, “this foul deed shall smell above the earth with carrion men, groaning for burial”, in which the word carrion implies that the bodies are rotting and infected with disease and bacteria. Another example: Daniel Defoe’s Robinson Crusoe, when the title character kills an unknown bird for food but finds “its flesh was Carrion, and fit for nothing.”

Read the Complete Text online or download PDF – click here for Robinson Crusoe

 

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Awards

Newbery and Caldecott Winners

The American Library Association announced its 2009 children’s book awards on January 26, including the biggest children’s prizes of the year, the Newbery Medal for literature and the Caldecott Medal for illustration. This year’s winners:

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Posted by on February 16, 2009 in book awards, News

 

Egrets to the Flames by Barbara Anton

Cover Image

Egrets to the Flames
Barbara Anton
ISBN 10: 1933515112
ISBN 13: 9781933515113
Fiction/Social Commentary
301 Pages
Oceanview Publishing
www.oceanviewpub.com


***
Eaton Literary Award Winner
Best Books Award Finalist!
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Best Books ’07

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Posted by on December 13, 2007 in ♥Best Sellers♥, ♥BOOKs♥, book awards, News, novel, NY Times

 

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Nat’l Book Award Winners!

nba_statue.jpg  NATIONAL BOOK AWARDS – 2007

Finalists were announced October 10 and last night, with writers actively picketing outside the hotel, the winners were announced.

A Brief History of NBA

March 16, 1950 publishers, editors, writers and critics gathered at the Waldorf-Astoria Hotel in New York City to celebrate the first annual National Book Awards, an award given to writers by writers. Honoring the years best work in four categories:
  * Fiction
  * Nonfiction
  * Poetry
  * Young People’s Literature

The NBA quickly established a reputation for recognizing literary excellence and these writers have shaped the foundation of American Literature.  After 57 years — the National Book Award remains one of the highest and most coveted honors within the writing community.  Read the rest of this entry »

 

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